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Jaywalker

Single Handing, Day Sailing & Other Heresy

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Will the tiller clutch be enough to help me tack and work (hoist) my main and head sail?

 

Do I really need the ST 1000 tiller autopilot?

 

It is a bit cumbersome not to have a roller furling, but I don´t want to mess around with sailing performance.

 

 

Tiller Clutch:

All it does it hold the tiller in one position. It is very easy to use, and it will enable you hoist your sails and tack. If you go to the foredeck, your movement will probably cause the boat to go off course. I use it while raising the main under power. It will keep your head into the wind, unless there is a lot of wave action. It's not a lot of money, about $75. I would try it and see if you like it before going to an auto pilot.

 

Jib furler:

My understanding that a jib furler itself will not hurt performance. What hurts performance is sailing with a partially furled jib or genoa.

 

I just installed a Schaefer CF500 jib furler. Installation was difficult, but I've been happy with it so far. I got a new jib made. It is basically the class jib, but with a longer luff and no battens. I've only been out in light air (2 - 6 mph) and the boat seems to point well. I haven't been out in a 10-knot breeze yet. I have an old drifter that I'll probably get modified for really light air PHRF race days.

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Tiller Clutch:

All it does it hold the tiller in one position. It is very easy to use, and it will enable you hoist your sails and tack. If you go to the foredeck, your movement will probably cause the boat to go off course. I use it while raising the main under power. It will keep your head into the wind, unless there is a lot of wave action. It's not a lot of money, about $75. I would try it and see if you like it before going to an auto pilot.

 

Jib furler:

My understanding that a jib furler itself will not hurt performance. What hurts performance is sailing with a partially furled jib or genoa.

 

I just installed a Schaefer CF500 jib furler. Installation was difficult, but I've been happy with it so far. I got a new jib made. It is basically the class jib, but with a longer luff and no battens. I've only been out in light air (2 - 6 mph) and the boat seems to point well. I haven't been out in a 10-knot breeze yet. I have an old drifter that I'll probably get modified for really light air PHRF race days.

 

Thanks Robert I am going to get the tiller clutch first.

 

Have you wired your J-22 inside (i.e. electrical panel, battery...radio etc..)?

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Some of things I have done for single handling and day sailing:

 

6. ditched the heavy and unreliable outboard for a Torqeedo 1003 outboard.

 

The autopilot and the electric outboard really make all the difference in the world. Docking into a slip with the electric outboard is a pleasure. The autopilot just makes everything easier.

 

 

Mark56,

 

The Torqueedo is interesting. Can you talk a bit about the range of the Torqueedo? What are the conditions where you use it? What percent of power does it take to move the boat in calm conditions? How many minutes/miles can you go in calm conditions? Choppy conditions? How long does it take to charge? Can you leave it plugged in for a week or two? Any other helpful info?

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Re: Torqeedo

 

I use it on Lake Washington in mostly calm conditions. The Torqeedo website has all the specs: www.torqeedo.com

 

At half throttle, it can run for about 3 hours. It needs overnight to charge a battery. You can leave the battery connected

to the charger. Choppy conditions are no problem in a boat the size of the J22.

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Some of things I have done for single handling and day sailing:

 

1. added a reef point to the main( on slides and very easy to handle);

 

 

Mark56,

 

I'm interested in the set up on your main. Do you have a stop in the luff groove of the mast to keep the slides from coming out when you lower the sail? As I recall, the feeder slot is kind of high up. Did you have to get your sail cover modified? Do you have slides on the foot of the sail too?

 

Is the new reef point below the standard reef point? How far above the boom?

 

Thanks,

 

Bob

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Mark56,

 

I'm interested in the set up on your main. Do you have a stop in the luff groove of the mast to keep the slides from coming out when you lower the sail? As I recall, the feeder slot is kind of high up. Did you have to get your sail cover modified? Do you have slides on the foot of the sail too?

 

Is the new reef point below the standard reef point? How far above the boom?

 

Thanks,

 

Bob

 

Yes, there is a "stop" in the luff groove to keep the slides from coming out. My sail cover came with my boat and I am not sure if it is sized differently than the "stock" cover. Yes, there are slides on the foot. My sail only has one reef point so I guess it is at the standard height. My previous sail had no reef point at all.

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If you are using slugs or slides you might consider making some plates. Using thin gauge aluminium, cut some strips about 1/2 inch longer than the cut out and about the width from the edge of the slot to the end of the flat on the aft side of the mast.

 

File everything nice and smooth and rounded over. Line each one up over the cut out hole, making sure that the edge is in line with the edge of the groove. Drill, tap and screw in place with a short 8 or 10 bolt. This will keep the slugs from falling out and let the sail stack at the boom.

 

The stack height isn't too scary on a 22 anyway, but it might make your cover fit better. PS- ease the outhaul when the sail is flaked.

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If you are using slugs or slides you might consider making some plates. Using thin gauge aluminium, cut some strips about 1/2 inch longer than the cut out and about the width from the edge of the slot to the end of the flat on the aft side of the mast.

 

File everything nice and smooth and rounded over. Line each one up over the cut out hole, making sure that the edge is in line with the edge of the groove. Drill, tap and screw in place with a short 8 or 10 bolt. This will keep the slugs from falling out and let the sail stack at the boom.

 

The stack height isn't too scary on a 22 anyway, but it might make your cover fit better. PS- ease the outhaul when the sail is flaked.

 

Will - Thanks for a very good idea, and for the reminder to ease the outhaul - I always forget.

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I started this thread back in October and have joyfully read all of these replies. It's wonderful that a thread that I thought was heretical has drawn so much interest. It's really a testament to the quality of the J design that folks are able to talk seriously about cruising them.

 

Earlier in the thread someone asked me to keep you posted on my progress. Here goes.

 

When I tested the market last fall I was greatly discouraged by the price of boats. Every boat I found seemed to be in top racing condition and demanding a racing price for features that I likely will not use. As a result I started concentrating on two other boats that were on my short list, always with the intention of buying something this spring. Hey look. It's this spring already!

 

In Novemeber I sailed a J22 oh so briefly and liked what I saw. I also spent two days watching a J22 raicng fleet from a safety boat during the last regatta of the year at our club. Thise experiences and the replies in this thread have assured me that I can single hand this boat.I even have some ideas that I moght share if I get a chance to try them.

 

I am hoping to look at some boats in the next week or two and recently have been encouraged by a contact from someone here.

 

I'll keep the thread posted.

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Now does anybody have any tested ideas to make the main as easy to manage? I'm still using the old luff rope.

To answer my own question, I had slugs installed on the luff of my main, and got some plates from Hall Spars to close the feeder slot on the mast, so they don't fall out. Now raising the main is easy as pie, and when I lower it, it almost flakes itself.

 

I am a very happy camper.

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I am considering storing my boat on a lift to keep it dry and to avoid hull painting. Supporting the keel is difficult. Considering the loads on the keel when sailing, I would assume that the load the hull and keel see in storage would be relatively minor, and therefore, not supporting it would be fine specially because there would be no dynamic effects to worry about. I am thinking on setting the boat on 2 slings and or 4 pads. Does anybody have opinions and/or experience with such an arrangement?

 

I enjoyed reading this postings. When I found it, I had already decided to buy a J22, which I did, to convert it for daysailing. Reading these comments is encouraging. Thank you.

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I keep my J22 on a hydrohoist. I coat the small small section at the bottom of of the rudder and keel that remain in the water with VC-17 once a year.

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